Idealism in the sixties

There are currents of idealism throughout Indian philosophyancient and modern. Hindu idealism often takes the form of monism or non-dualismespousing the view that a unitary consciousness is the essence or meaning of the phenomenal reality and plurality. Buddhist idealism on the other hand is more epistemic and is not a metaphysical monism, which Buddhists consider eternalistic and hence not the middle way between extremes espoused by the Buddha.

Idealism in the sixties

Meet them now, before immersing yourself in the hot tub of bathos about the Sixties occasioned by the death of Jerry Garcia.

It was a decade of extremes, of transformational change and bizarre contrasts: flower children and assassins, idealism and alienation, rebellion and backlash. For many in the massive post-World War II baby boom generation, it was both the . The Sixties During the 's, times were good for most Americans. President Eisenhower had kept his promise to end the war in Korea and America was finally at peace. He said idealism lies "just below the surface of the pragmatism and calculation" that have come to characterize the post-war baby boom. That generation will increasingly turn to the nonconformity of the s, searching internally for new "symbols and yardsticks of personal success," he said.

If you are not steeped in the cult of the Sixties, you may not know that he was the "rock oracle" of the Grateful Dead, "a band that epitomizes freedom" The Washington Post.

Garcia, a guitarist, was a "mellow icon of '60s idealism" and embodied "psychedelic optimism" The New York Times. Wolfgang, 23, and Lisa, 24, will be sentenced next week by a California judge who they must hope is a Deadhead, as the hand's astonishingly loyal and often nomadic fans like to be called.

He could sentence the Maryland couple to six years in prison for abandoning their 3-year-old son at a San Bernardino mall on June 2. Then, with the help of a driver of a strawberry truck they met in Nevada, they headed for Maryland. There they boasted of abandoning their son, and talked of hiking the Appalachian Trail.

On the Trail a sheriff's investigator first detained Lisa on a warrant for failing to appear in a child support ease involving her four other children. Later both were charged with endangering their child.

What a bummer for two Deadheads who probably only wanted to have their own version of the Summer of Love, as the summer of was known in San Francisco. Garcia, who was rarely a martyr to the strictures of healthy behavior, died in his sleep at a drug treatment center.

He had used a lot of LSD and heroin and other substances in his day, but his death at age 53 strikes his fans as proof that the universe as currently administered is unfair. The New York Times front-page obituary said that the Grateful Dead "symbolized a spirit of communal bliss, with freewheeling, anything-can-happen music," and Garcia "had come to represent the survival of s' idealism.

And they may well be wondering just what exactly they did that was so awfully wrong. Why are the authorities now acting so, well, so judgmental? After all, the Sixties are incessantly praised and they were a celebration of "liberation," understood as emancipation from the oppression of social restraints and from the repression of inner restraints.

Duties, responsibilities, obligations and other notions that interfere with immediate gratifications were understood to be mere "hang-ups. The Sixties were, and the unending rhapsodizing about that decade is, a sustained exhortation to a four-word ethic: Garcia, who was as personable as he was industrious, and the Grateful Dead cannot be held accountable for the character of all their fans.

But he and the band were pleased to be thought of as keepers of the flame of the Sixties. The band's music may have been grand but the band has promoted much more than music.

Around it has hung an aroma of disdain for inhibitions on recreational uses of drugs and sex.

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During the band's nearly year life the costs of "liberation" from such inhibitions have been made manifest in millions of shattered lives and miles of devastated cities.

The band has been a touring time capsule, keeping alive the myth that there is something inherently noble about adopting an adversary stance toward "bourgeois" or "middle class" values. But it turns out that society's success depends on these values. Never mind that the band is big business some years it has grossed more than some major league baseball teams and that some of its fans are stockbrokers.

The band has prospered as the emblem of an era and is complicit in the continuing consequences of the era. The spirit of the Sixties was, strictly speaking, infantile. For an infant, any appetite is self-legitimizing.

Infantilism was the leitmotif of that decade and is the insistent theme of much of today's popular culture. In the current issue of The New Republic, Stanley Crouch explains why "the value of youth is hysterically championed at the expense of a mature sense of life. This exploits the insecurities of young people by telling them, over and over, that never growing up is the best defense against an oppressive world where fun isn't given its proper due.

The portion of popular culture that constantly sentimentalizes the Sixties also panders to the arrested development of the Sixties generation which is no longer young but wishes it were and seeks derivative vitality from graying rock stars.

However, every once in a while mortality rears its ugly head. Then the Sixties generation gets terribly serious and goes to the movies.

About That 'Sixties Idealism'

To "The Big Chill," to be exact. You remember that one, in which popular music is the all-purpose cue for memories and some alumni of the Sixties gather and act almost affronted by the fact that death can happen to someone of their generation.

Speaking of a mature sense of life. Shortly before she died of a heroin overdose, Janis Joplin sang, "Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose. What does it mean to say a rock band "epitomizes freedom"? And what is the meaning of the phrase "psychedelic optimism"? The adjective "psychedelic" is an echo of the Sixties.

Webster's dictionary used to refer, not altogether helpfully, to "a person with psychedelic social and cultural interests and orientation.We tend to equate the idealism of the s with the student movements and the counterculture that offered the most dramatic challenges to American policies and conventions.

Idealism in the sixties

But the truth is, idealism crossed generations and permeated almost all levels of public life. He said idealism lies "just below the surface of the pragmatism and calculation" that have come to characterize the post-war baby boom.

That generation will increasingly turn to the nonconformity of the s, searching internally for new "symbols and yardsticks of personal success," he said. Many have written that he was a metaphor for the failure and ‘death’ of the idealism of the Sixties.

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William Hurt, giving one of his many great performances, plays the role of Nick. Following graduation, he went to Vietnam and after that he tried his hand as a radio talk-show host in San Francisco. We tend to equate the idealism of the s with the student movements and the counterculture that offered the most dramatic challenges to American policies and conventions.

But the truth is, idealism crossed generations and permeated almost all levels of public life. The Sixties During the 's, times were good for most Americans. President Eisenhower had kept his promise to end the war in Korea and America was finally at peace.

Foster's The Case for Idealism argues that the physical world is the logical creation of natural, non-logical constraints on human sense-experience. Foster's latest defense of his views (phenomenalistic idealism) is in his book A World for Us: The Case for Phenomenalistic Idealism.

Uneven "Bobby" Revisits s Idealism - Movie Review